Are you plan for leaving your job

I was asked the same interview prep question three times last week. They all more or less went like this:

“I have a simple question. I was let go from my job this week. The reason was because:

A) I had a conflict with my boss that came to a head.

Or

B) I was a whistleblower on a wrong practice my department was doing and instead of fixing it they let me go.

Or

C) My department was moved to Cincinnati and I could have gone, but I’m sick of doing this job.

What do I say for my “reason for leaving (RFL)” my job?”

A simple question. Yes. Simple to ask.

Not so simple to answer.

Can you see why?

Everyone’s situation is different.

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all reason-for-leaving answer.

These are the unique points you need to consider when practicing your reason for leaving:

  • Were you there a long time or a short time?
  • Is this really the only time you had a conflict with your boss or has it been ongoing?
  • Will they give or not give you a good reference?
  • Are you looking to stay in the same field or do a career change?

It’s these answers that help us devise a RFL.

The “Reason for Leaving” answer has to make sense for your situation.

For instance, you cannot say you left because you want a career change when you’re interviewing for the same job.

Constructing a truthful, diplomatic and sensical RFL is a real thing a job seeker must do to advance in the interview process.

You can’t just wing it and expect someone like me to give you a one-sized-fits-all answer.